herbholist

Debunked: Orthorexia: Can Healthy Eating Be a Disorder by CNN Time

In Uncategorized on February 13, 2010 at 9:48 pm

Time Magazine states (http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1963297,00.html) that insistent healthy eating is a new disorder. It describes the slippery slope of healthy eating toward anexoria. I totally agree that not eating foods that you percieve to be unhealthy can lead to anorexia and malnutrition if you live inside a McDonalds kitchen. But why do psychologists and psychiatrists have to name it a new disease? The Time Magazine article explains:

As the list of foods to steer clear of (bye-bye, trans fats and high-fructose corn syrup) continues to grow, eating-disorder experts are increasingly confronted with patients like Rutzel who speak of nervously shunning foods with artificial flavors, colors or preservatives and rigidly following a particular diet, such as vegan or raw foods. Women may be more prone to this kind of restrictive consumption than men, keeping running tabs of verboten foods and micromanaging food prep. Many opt to go hungry rather than eat anything less than wholesome.

Yet when Rutzel first sought help for anemia and osteopenia, a precursor of osteoporosis triggered by her avoidance of calcium, her doctor in upstate New York, where she attended college, had never heard of orthorexia. “You should be trying to eat healthy,” she remembers him telling her. He couldn’t quite grasp that he was talking to a health nut who believed there were few truly healthy foods she felt were safe to eat. Her condition was eventually identified as anorexia, a diagnosis that organizations like the Washington-based Eating Disorders Coalition think is a mistake.

For the past decade, psychiatrists have been working on the fifth edition of the DSM — referred to as DSM-V — to refine the classifications used by mental-health professionals to diagnose and research disorders. Without a listing in the DSM, it’s tough to get treatment covered by insurance. And for researchers angling for grant money, a disorder’s absence from the DSM makes it hard to get research funded.

Without a listing in the DSM, it’s tough to get treatment covered by insurance. And for researchers angling for grant money, a disorder’s absence from the DSM makes it hard to get research funded.

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Posted via web from Mind and Body Health Myths that You Still Believe – Bioprin

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